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The Apocryphal New Testament Easy to use collection of English translations of the New Testament Apocrypha.

Secondary Acts of John 1

  • (i) The Acts of John in Rome. This account dating from the sixth century is given in two forms, both included by Lipsius–Bonnet as chs. 1–14 (ii.1, pp. 151–60). 2 Bonnet's chs. 15–17 (also a late composition) containing local stories based on Miletus and found in one manuscript of Prochorus were printed only as a footnote in his edition. Junod and Kaestli, CCA, pp. 862–80 and 881–6 also edit the Acts of John in Rome.

  • (ii) The Acts of John attributed to Prochorus of the fifth or sixth century is concerned mainly with miracles performed by John in Patmos. Some 150 manuscripts survive, and many are valuable in that they preserve extracts of the original Acts of John.

  • (iii) ‘Pseudo‐Abdias’, Virtutes Apostolorum: Virtutes Iohannis (sixth century). 3 Reproduces Acts of John 62–86 (used by Festugière for his trans.) and 106–15 in a version close to the Greek text.

  • (iv) Passio Iohannis of Pseudo‐Melito (Mellitus) of the sixth century. This is close to, but shorter than, Pseudo‐Abdias, Virtutes. The two works were independent of one another but are both likely to have developed from the same, now lost, Latin source, which was translated from the Greek.

  • (v) Liber Flavus Fergusiorum. This fifteenth‐century Irish text contains stories about the life of John. Most of them are taken from Pseudo‐Melito, but some of the others may have developed from the original Acts of John. There are links with P. Oxy. 850. 4 For details see Junod and Kaestli CCA, pp. 109–12.

  • (vi) The Syriac Acts of John, son of Zebedee, is independent of the preceding versions. 5 Wright, Apoc. Acts i. 4–65; ii (Eng. trans.), 3–60. See James, ANT 469–70, and Erbetta, ii. 130–1, for summaries in English and Italian respectively. The scene for this text is set in Ephesus. Included in these Acts is the story that John wrote his Gospel in one hour. An Arabic version exists (see bibliography above). It is of the fifth‐sixth century.

Notes:

1 On the possibility that some episodes in these works may belong in the original Acts of John see above, pp. 304–6.

2 Bonnet's chs. 15–17 (also a late composition) containing local stories based on Miletus and found in one manuscript of Prochorus were printed only as a footnote in his edition. Junod and Kaestli, CCA, pp. 862–80 and 881–6 also edit the Acts of John in Rome.

3 Reproduces Acts of John 62–86 (used by Festugière for his trans.) and 106–15 in a version close to the Greek text.

4 For details see Junod and Kaestli CCA, pp. 109–12.

5 Wright, Apoc. Acts i. 4–65; ii (Eng. trans.), 3–60. See James, ANT 469–70, and Erbetta, ii. 130–1, for summaries in English and Italian respectively. The scene for this text is set in Ephesus. Included in these Acts is the story that John wrote his Gospel in one hour. An Arabic version exists (see bibliography above).

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