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pageId="iii"Oxford Bible Atlas Contextualizes the stories and lands of the Bible through user-friendly maps and illustrations.

Jacob

The story of Jacob, like that of Abraham, associates the ancestor with a number of sanctuaries. According to the biblical account, Jacob deceitfully obtained his father Isaac's blessing, thereby doing his brother Esau out of his birthright (Gen. 27 ). He then set out from Beer‐sheba for Paddan‐aram (Upper Mesopotamia) in search of a wife, and it was on the way that he stopped at Bethel overnight and had his famous dream of the ladder joining heaven and earth, setting up a stone to mark the place (Gen. 28 ). He ultimately returned with his wives Leah and Rachel. Genesis 32 describes his encounters with ‘the angels of God’ at Mahanaim (verse 1 ) and his wrestling with an unknown assailant, probably to be understood as God (verse 28 ), near the River Jabbok at Penuel/Peniel (verses 30–1 ). The narrative also tells of his meeting with his brother Esau, after which he went by way of Succoth to Shechem, where he erected an altar, while Esau returned to Seir (Edom) (Gen. 33: 16–20 ). Subsequently Jacob went again to Bethel and built an altar (Gen. 35: 1–7 ). Rachel died and was buried near Bethlehem (Gen. 35: 19 ). Jacob then came to his father Isaac at Mamre; there Isaac died and was buried by his sons (Gen. 35: 27–9 ).

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