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pageId="iii"Oxford Bible Atlas Contextualizes the stories and lands of the Bible through user-friendly maps and illustrations.

Nebuchadrezzar's Successors

Nebuchadrezzar's son Amel‐marduk (562–559), known in the Bible as Evil‐Merodach (2 Kgs. 25: 27 ), was succeeded in turn by Nergal‐shar‐uṣur (Neriglissar; 559–556). It is possible that he is the Nergal‐sharezer mentioned as having been present at the siege of Jerusalem in Jeremiah 39: 3, 13 . He restored temples at Babylon and nearby Borsippa, and campaigned in the north‐western part of the empire against Appuasha of Pirindu who had entered Khume in order to take plunder and captives. He was pursued to Ura and Kirshu, the island of Pitusu was overrun, and Sallune was burnt. His successor, Labashimarduk, reigned for only a few days. Then Nabonidus (Nabunaid) became king of Babylonia (556–539). He was of priestly descent, and his mother had been taken captive by Nebuchadrezzar at Haran in 610. He too engaged in campaigns in the Mediterranean coastland regions and in Khume, but his particular concern was to ensure control over the caravan routes for southern Arabia. To that end he took the important oasis city of Tema and established it as his royal residence. His son Belshazzar was placed in charge of affairs in Babylon during his father's absence, though strictly speaking he was not actually king as suggested in Daniel 5 .

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