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pageId="iii"Oxford Bible Atlas Contextualizes the stories and lands of the Bible through user-friendly maps and illustrations.

Biblical Sites

Zev Radovan, www.BibleLandPictures.com

Of the places in Jerusalem mentioned in the New Testament it is only possible to locate a few with certainty. It is likely that Pilate's headquarters, also known as the praetorium (Matt. 27: 27 ) or ‘palace’ (Mark 15: 16 ) was in fact the same as Herod's palace on the western hill. If that is the case, then the ‘Stone Pavement’, also called Gabbatha (John 19:13 ) must have been a paved open space in that vicinity, perhaps just inside the Gennath Gate. It therefore cannot be identified with the famous stone pavement which is preserved on the site of the Antonia Tower, close to the Roman triple arch which is known traditionally as the ‘Ecce Homo Arch’ but which probably dates from the 2nd century CE (though a 1st‐century date has been defended). A further corollary is that the ‘Via Dolorosa’, the traditional route taken by Jesus from his trial to his crucifixion, does not represent an actual route that would have led from the place of judgement to the place of execution. The site of ‘The Place of the Skull’, or Golgotha (Matt. 27: 33; Mark 15: 22; John 19: 17; see also Luke 23: 33 ) is uncertain, but a tradition which goes back at least to the 4th century, and which may be correct, places it in a area of Jewish tombs one of which is claimed as the tomb in which Jesus' body was placed. Traditional sites of both the crucifixion and the tomb are now venerated inside the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.

Within the Temple area, the ‘Beautiful’ gate (Acts 3: 10 ) may have been the main eastern entrance to the Court of the Women. Solomon's Porch or Portico (John 10: 23; Acts 3: 11; 5: 12 ) may have formed one side of this court or may have been a colonnaded walkway on the eastern side of the outer court. Tradition has associated the ‘Pinnacle of the Temple’ (Matt. 4: 5; Luke 4: 9 ) with the south‐eastern corner of the Temple platform. Two pools mentioned in the New Testament, Bethzatha or Bethesda (John 5: 2 ) and Siloam (John 9: 7 ) can be located by extant remains. It is noteworthy that, in the same vicinity as the former, a temple dedicated to the Roman god of healing, Aesclepius, was built after the destruction of the Second Temple and was a feature of the Roman city, Aelia Capitolina. This suggests the possibility of an ongoing connection of that location with healing.

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