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pageId="iii"Oxford Bible Atlas Contextualizes the stories and lands of the Bible through user-friendly maps and illustrations.

The Third Journey

Paul again went from Antioch overland through Galatian Phrygia and journeyed on to Ephesus, establishing the church there, and remaining for some time (Acts 18: 23–19: 41 ). While there he seems to have maintained contact with the church in Corinth via messengers, and it is possible that he visited Corinth himself. Paul left Ephesus after a disturbance caused when Demetrius, the silversmith, took exception to his denunciation of the making of images for the temple of Artemis. He then travelled through Macedonia and on into Achaia, where he remained for three months, before returning via Philippi whence he sailed to Troas and joined delegates from a number of churches who were also heading for Jerusalem. They sailed via Assos, Mitylene, ‘opposite Chios’, and Samos, and reached Miletus. There Paul summoned the elders of the Ephesian church so that he could take his leave of them. He and his companions then sailed via Cos, and Rhodes, to Patara where they found a ship bound for Tyre. From Tyre Paul sailed via Ptolemais to Caesarea and, despite warnings that he should not do so, continued his journey to Jerusalem (Acts 20: 1–21: 17 ). There he was arrested and eventually transported to Rome (see ‘The Roman Empire: The Background of the New Testament’ ).

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