We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

Jonah - Introduction

The book of Jonah is unlike other prophetic books in that it contains a short story about a prophet * rather than a collection of prophetic speeches. Furthermore, Jonah is active not in his own country but in Nineveh, a great Assyrian city feared and hated by the Israelites, who more than once suffered at the hands of its conquering soldiers (2 Kings 18.9–16; Nah 3.1–4 ). Because the wicked Ninevites repent and are saved, though Jonah is displeased, the story has traditionally been understood to teach God's universal salvation, criticizing at the same time those who think salvation is limited to Israel alone. The story also emphasizes related themes: the importance of human repentance and the depth of divine compassion. In addition, the narrative also contrasts the frailty of the prophet with the power of the prophet's message (Jer 1.4–10 ).

Jonah has been unusually difficult to place into a particular historical setting. A Jonah son of Amittai ( 1.1 ) is mentioned by Israel's historian as an eighth-century prophet (2 Kings 14.25 ), which accounts for the book of Jonah's position together with other eighth-century prophets, such as Amos and Micah, among the twelve Minor Prophets. But these two prophets have nothing in common, and most scholars have preferred a post-exilic date (sixth to fourth centuries) for the book of Jonah, on the basis of its language and major themes. Nineveh was an important Assyrian city until its fall near the end of the seventh century (612 BCE), but it may well have remained a powerful symbol of the enemy among Israel's later prophets and storytellers.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice