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The Catholic Study Bible A special version of the New American Bible, with a wealth of background information useful to Catholics.

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2 Chronicles

Leslie J. Hoppe

Chronicles and the Israelite Kingdoms

The second book of Chronicles continues the story of Israel with the accession of Solomon to the throne of David. Comparing the way Chronicles tells this story with the narratives in the books of Kings helps to see the purpose of the Chronicler. For example, after Solomon's death and the breakup of the Davidic‐Solomonic empire into the two national states of Israel and Judah, the Chronicler all but ignores the Northern Kingdom (Israel) and its kings. He focuses his attention on the Southern Kingdom (Judah). The Chronicler mentions Israel only when the story of Judah makes it necessary to do so. By contrast, throughout the books of Kings, the author synchronizes the reigns of the kings in the south with those in the north (for example, 1 Kgs 15, 1.9.25.33 ). In 2 Chronicles there is only one such synchronization: 2 Chronicles 13, 1 . The Chronicler wishes to focus on the Davidic dynasty and what was, in his opinion, its finest achievement—the Temple in Jerusalem. Also, the Chronicler's treatment of Judah's kings focuses almost entirely on the promotion of legitimate worship and the performance of the proper ritual.

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