We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

Related Content

Commentary on Genesis

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side
Commentary spanning earlier chapters

33.1–17 : Partial reunion with Esau.

10 :

Like seeing the face of God, who at Penuel (or Peniel) also proved to be gracious ( 32.30–31 ).

12–17 :

Esau proposes to stay with Jacob, but Jacob sends him ahead, promising to join with him (v. 14 ). Jacob does not join him, however (v. 17 ), perhaps noting that Esau had always planned to wait to kill him until their father died ( 27.41; cf. 35.29 ).

17 :

Succoth means “booths.” Its precise location is uncertain.

32.1–32 : Journey toward Esau.

1–2 :

The Transjordanian town of Mahanaim was the site of important events (2 Sam 2.8–9; 17.24–29 ) and an administrative center in the time of Solomon (1 Kings 4.14 ). Angels, see 28.12n.

3–21 :

The ever clever Jacob develops multiple strategies to appease his brother: dividing his camp (vv. 6–8 ), praying for divine help (vv. 9–12 ), and then sending several waves of livestock as a gift to Esau (vv. 13–21 ).

22–32 :

Where Abraham unknowingly hosted divine visitors ( 18.1–15 ), Jacob unknowingly fights with God (Ex 4.24–26 ). The narrative includes a complicated word play on the names of Jacob (Heb “ya^aqob”), the river Jabbok (“yabboq”; modern Nahr ez‐Zerqa) and wrestled (“wayye’abeq”; v. 24 ).

25 :

Jacob is so strong ( 29.10 ) that he is winning the contest until his divine opponent pulls Jacob's hip out of joint.

26 :

The divine being had to vanish before sunrise—a mark of the antiquity of the tradition on which this story is based.

28 :

Jacob's new name reflects a new self: no longer was he the “supplanter” ( 25.26; 27.36 ), but Israel ( 35.10 ), which probably originally meant “El rules” (with El being the head of the Northwest Semitic pantheon). Here, however, it is interpreted to mean “the one who strives with God” (cf. Hos 12.3–4 ). And with humans refers to Jacob's strife with Esau and Laban. In this way, the community of Israel, as descendants of this god‐wrestler, is depicted as a group that successfully strives with God and humans.

29 :

The divine being refuses lest Jacob, by possessing the name, gain power over him.

30 :

Jacob had feared to see Esau's face (v. 20 ), but instead saw God face to face and lived (see 16.13n. ).

30–31 :

The story is located at Penuel/Peniel (“face of El”), one of the first capitals of the Northern Kingdom (1 Kings 12.25 ).

32 :

An Israelite prohibition against eating the thigh muscle of an animal is cited as testimony to the truth of the story. This prohibition is reflected nowhere else in the Bible.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice