We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Study Bible Study Bible supplemented with commentary from scholars of various religions.

The First Letter of Paul to the Thessalonians - Introduction

According to Acts 17.1–18.5 , Paul came to Thessalonica (modern Salonica) with Silas and Timothy during his second missionary journey, after leaving Philippi. His stay of three weeks was spent in preaching the messiahship of Jesus in the local synagogue. Some Jews and many “God-fearing” Gentiles were converted. Jews precipitated a riot, and charged the missionaries with acting against the laws of the emperor. Consequently, the Christians sent Paul and Silas by night to the neighboring town of Beroea. Success in preaching there prompted the Jews of Thessalonica to come and create a disturbance similar to that made in their own city, and for safety's sake Paul was constrained to leave alone for Athens. He next went to Corinth where he was joined by Silas and Timothy.

This picture does not correspond with the one found in the letter itself. The letter presupposes a much longer stay at Thessalonica ( 2.7–9; see Phil. 4.16 ) and a church predominantly composed of converts from paganism ( 1.9 ); the letter does not speak of any persecution suffered by Paul in the city; it states that it was from Athens that Paul sent Timothy back to Thessalonica ( 3.1 ). The letter was probably written from Corinth just after Timothy's completion of his mission ( 3.6 ). While at Corinth (Acts 18.12 ) Paul was brought before the tribunal of the Roman Gallio, whose term as proconsul was around 51–52 C.E.; if that information is reliable 1 Thessalonians, written around 51 C.E., is the first of the Pauline epistles.

The letter deals primarily with questions concerning the Parousia (the future coming of Christ): its time (e.g. 5.1–2 ), the suffering of Christians in relation to it (e.g. 3.3 ), and the destiny of those who die in advance of its arrival (e.g. 4.13–14 ).

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice