We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Study Bible Study Bible supplemented with commentary from scholars of various religions.

Acts of the Apostles - Introduction

With this book the author of the third Gospel continues the story of the birth of the Christian church. Acts shows a wide acquaintance with the Hellenistic world, its customs and political organizations; and its good, if not artistic, Greek betrays the hand of a cosmopolitan author, whom tradition has identified as Luke, a physician (Col. 4.14; 2 Tim. 4.11 ). Written to show how God continues to fulfill the divine plan for the salvation of humankind, a plan which our author understands to have begun with Israel, Acts follows the church from its origin at Pentecost (ch. 2 ) through the geographical progression which Jesus himself had announced ( 1.8 ). Led by God's Spirit, the church moved from a small Jewish group centered in Jerusalem to a worldwide movement embracing Rome, the capital of the world (ch. 28 ). This shift from Jewish to Gentile mission was a primary interest of the author, who details how admission of the first Gentiles (ch. 10 ) led to a council (ch. 15 ) whose decision opened Christian fellowship to all people. Following ancient custom, Luke has composed summaries (e.g. 2.42–43; 5.12–16; 9.31–32 ) and speeches (e.g. 2.14–36; 3.12–26; 5.35–39; 7.2–53; 10.34–43; 15.13–21; 17.22–31; 28.25–28 ) as a method of informing the reader about the meaning of the events that are narrated. Our author may have had some sources available (e.g. the “we” sections: 16.10–18; 20.5–15; 21.1–18; 27.1–28.16 ; collections of local traditions from Palestine and Antioch), but they have been worked so skillfully into the narrative that their reconstruction is very difficult. That these sources were incomplete, however, is indicated by the inexact chronological references throughout the narrative, and by the fact that information contained in Paul's letters seems not to have been available to the author. Despite the fact, Acts stands as a mighty witness to the conviction that there is a divine working within human history to accomplish God's saving purpose for humankind.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice