We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible A richly illustrated account of the story of the Bible written by leading scholars.

A Bible Revised from the ‘Hebrew Truth’: Jerome

Jerome (Hieronymus), probably born in 331 of wealthy Christian parents in Dalmatia, studied classical Latin culture and later rhetoric with a famous school-master in Rome. During a stay in Trier he was touched by the monastic ideal. About 372, coming to Antioch, he learned Greek and attended Bible courses with Apollonius of Laodicea, who belonged to the Antiochene school. For a while he retreated to the hermits into the adjoining desert and lived in a cave. He also took Hebrew lessons with a Jew. After some years of travel, in 382 he arrived in Rome, where Pope Damasus I (366–84) made him his secretary and suggested he should produce a revision of the different Latin texts of the Bible used in the western congregations. Jerome completed a revision of the four gospels. He also gave biblical lessons. Followed by two noble Christian ladies: Paula and her daughter Eustochium, he left Rome in 385 for Palestine. In Bethlehem they founded a monastery for men and another for women. There he remained for the rest of his life. He wrote several (eclectic) Bible commentaries, but his most important work was the production of a complete new Latin Bible. He started with a revision of the Septuagint text of the Psalter, comparing it with the other Greek translations and the Hebrew text. Introduced as official text in Gallia (Gallican Psalter) it later supplanted Jerome's psalm translations from the Hebrew. After the revision of some other books Jerome abandoned this project. Having improved his Hebrew knowledge by learning from a Jew, he started anew, now translating from the Hebrew original, finishing the so-called Vulgate (common Bible) about 406. In his prologue to the books Samuel to Kings he also restricted the canon to the size of the Hebrew Bible and stated the sequence of the biblical books accordingly. Though this new version was much better than the existing ones, it took until the ninth century before it was officially received in the whole western church.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice