We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

Essay with Commentary on Post-Biblical Jewish Literature - Introduction

This anthology offers selections from post-biblical Jewish texts which are not dealt with elsewhere in the Commentary. The Jewish texts that were accepted as canonical or deutero-canonical by the synagogue and the church are only a portion of the Jewish literature that has survived from antiquity. The non-canonical literature is of the utmost importance in understanding early Judaism and in putting the Bible into its historical context.

The anthology is arranged according to very broad genres, Bible interpretation, law, apocalyptic, wisdom, hymns and prayers, rules of religious associations, and hagiography, which often cut across the extant texts, so that some texts will be found quoted under more than one genre. The comments appended to the extracts in the Anthology proper are intended to elucidate only the passage quoted. More general discussion of the texts from which the passages have been taken is given in the discussion of the Major Genres which precedes the Anthology: a system of cross-references leads the reader from one section to the other.

Most of the texts included in the anthology were written in the Second Temple period, but not all. Also found here are selections from early rabbinic literature, composed mainly between the third and sixth centuries CE. This literature has been included because, though written later, it contains early material and is often cited in discussions of the earlier texts. Students of the OT, the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha, and the NT should have at least a nodding acquaintance with the rich and important rabbinic texts, while bearing their later date and the dangers of anachronism in mind. They should also bear in mind that many Second Temple period texts survive only in much later versions, often translated into other languages. Even when there are good grounds for believing that a given text originated in Second Temple times, it may be well-nigh impossible to be sure of its Second Temple form. Strictly speaking the only absolutely primary evidence for Jewish religious literature of the Second Temple period is the Dead Sea scrolls, but it would be extreme to confine our study to the scrolls and ignore the other Jewish texts that have survived from antiquity, however problematic their transmission.

The Introduction to the Apocrypha (INTRO.APOC) provides the wider historical setting of the texts excerpted in the anthology. Bibliographical information on the texts will be indicated at the appropriate points and expanded in the References. A more general bibliography on the literature will be found in the Main Bibliography.

The texts have all been newly translated for the anthology (though existing renderings were gratefully consulted) in order to embody the latest research, and to ensure maximum intelligibility and evenness of style.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice