We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

Canonicity and Influence.

Of all the pre-Mishnaic writings that were eventually excluded from the Hebrew canon, the book of Ben Sira was the most widely used. The fragments found at Qumran and Masada show that the book was widely used in antiquity. (Nothing about it was especially congenial either to the Essenes of Qumran or to the Zealots.) Although its use was reputedly banned by R. Akiba, it was venerated by many rabbis in the subsequent generations. Verses from the book are often cited as popular proverbs, and it is also often cited by name (Leiman 1976: 92–102). None the less, the Hebrew text was eventually lost. In Christian circles, the status of the book was ambiguous, like that of the other Apocrypha. On the one hand it was widely cited, and included in some canonical lists; on the other hand some authorities, most notably St Jerome, limited the canonical scriptures to those found in the HB (see Box and Oesterly 1913: 298–303). Unlike the Hebrew text, however, the Greek and Latin versions of Sirach were transmitted continuously with the other scriptures.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice