We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Studies Provides a comprehensive survey of Biblical scholarship in a variety of disciplines.

Conclusion

The above sketch has by no means exhausted the current problems. Among the future tasks of a biblical theology, that of the relationship of biblical theology to Jewish–Christian dialogue, stands alongside the question of the relationship between biblical theology and dogmatics. The not yet fully explained relationship between a religious and historical methodology and the normative claims of the Bible plays a role also in the context of Jewish–Christian dialogue. This is not only because the question of the ‘centre’ of the Old Testament is a specifically Christian concern (see the contributions in Janowski and Lohfink 1995, 2001, also Janowski 1999b), but because the total biblical perspective contains a ‘kernel of anti-Judaism’ (Levenson 1991 and Janowski 1999a: 251–5, 273–81), and to this extent is not suitable for Jewish–Christian dialogue. The fact, however, that the ‘Bible of Israel’ as the Old Testament is the common Scripture of Jews and Christians to which both communities of faith relate in different ways without monopolizing it, gives grounds for hope, and to both sides if one looks beyond ideological closed minds.

In spite of these open questions, which can be multiplied, there can be general agreement that who ever is concerned with basic questions of a biblical theology is motivated by the wish to contribute to the specific character of Christian faith. The double task of defining our Christian identity without disregarding that Bible which is common to Jews and Christians (Tanach/Old Testament), while at the same time affirming the unity of Scripture (Old and New Testaments) belongs to the central tasks of all theological disciplines in the future. For,

the biblical traditions which are connected with each in many ways and which have been bound to each other in many ways build a construction that drives the experience of the work of God among human beings, the living memory of that and the expectation of this action drama and which makes possible historical, cultural and ecclesiastical learning and growing in this knowledge. (Welker 1998a: 1552)

This sketch can be ended by saying that scripture is a self- authenticating witness as a living whole, in that it indicates, in many perspectives, the divine action upon and in the creation, and that it is itself a living source for the present (cf. Luther 1897: 7. 97, 24–5).

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2022. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice