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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

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Commentary on Isaiah

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29.1–8 : Siege of Jerusalem.

God will allow Jerusalem to be besieged as David once besieged it (2 Sam 5.6–9 ). The experience will be like a descent into the underworld (cf. 5.14–15; 8.19 ), but there will be a sudden deliverance—as happened when Sennacherib withdrew from Jerusalem in 701.

1 :

Ariel, variously explained; perhaps an altar‐hearth (Ezek 43.15 ), alluding to Jerusalem.

6 :

Cf. 30.30 .

29.9–16 : Failure of the warning.

Blindness, which also affects prophets, is a common metaphor for religious insensitivity in Isaiah; cf. 6.9–10 .

11–12 :

A later comment applying the idea of literacy to the reception or nonreception of the prophet's message in written form.

13–14 :

Against conventional worship carried out without conviction; cf. 1.10–17 .

15–16 :

Against the professional purveyors of wisdom, especially in the political sphere. For the image of potter and clay, see 45.9; Jer 18.1–6 .

29.17–24: A later assurance of a hopeful future.:

22 :

Abraham, cf. 41.8; 51.2 . Abraham, redeemed by God's call to journey into the promised land, becomes the model for those who returned to Judah in the post‐disaster period.

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