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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

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Commentary on Isaiah

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Commentary spanning earlier chapters

Chs 36–39 : Historical appendix.

Except for 38.9–20 , these chapters parallel 2 Kings 18.13,17–20.19 , omitting the account of Hezekiah's surrender to Sennacherib (2 Kings 18.14–16 ). These chapters seem to conflate two accounts: two boastful Assyrian speeches ( 36.4–20; 37.10–13 ), two visits of Hezekiah to the Temple ( 37.1,14–20 ), two oracular utterances of Isaiah ( 37.5–7,21–35 ).

39.1–8 : The Babylonian delegation

(cf. 2 Kings 20.12–19 ).

1 :

Merodach‐baladan, Marduk‐apal‐iddina, ruler of Babylon 721–710 BCE and again in 703 when his revolt, supported by Judah and passively by Egypt, was crushed by the Assyrians. He continued to plot against Assyria from exile.

2 :

Since the purpose of the visit was to form an anti‐Assyrian alliance, Hezekiah wished to demonstrate his potential as an ally. Note, however, that earlier he had to empty his treasury to buy off the Assyrians (2 Kings 18.14–16 ).

5–8 :

The prediction of exile in Babylon creates a link with chs 40–48 , replacing 35.8–10 after the insertion of chs 36–39 .

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