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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

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Commentary on 2 Kings

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1.1–53 : The destruction continues.

Jehu turns his attention to the wider family (cf. Elijah's prophecy in 1 Kings 21.21 ).

1 :

The seventy sons (cf. Judg 8.30 ) were the people from among whom a successor to Jehoram would normally be chosen.

9 :

Jehu knows who killed the princes, but the people, asleep when the heads arrive, do not. The aim is to convince them that it is the LORD who is at work in overthrowing the house of Ahab.

12–17 :

Jehonadab son of Rechab appears in Jer 35 as the founder of a purist religious group committed to Israel's older ways. He becomes a witness to events in Samaria, as all who are left there of the house of the innovator Ahab are destroyed (v. 17; see 1 Kings 21.21 ).

18–31 :

Samaria had been a focal point for the worship of Baal (see 1 Kings 16.32–33 ). Jehu's strategy in removing it is to pretend to enthusiasm while preparing for slaughter. His efforts result in a dynastic promise, although this promise is weaker than the eternal promise to David: His descendants will sit on the throne of Israel to the fourth generation (v. 30 ). What Jehu has done that is right (v. 30 ) far outweighs what he continues to do that is wrong—retaining the golden calves at Bethel and Dan (vv. 29,31 ; see 1 Kings 16.25–33n.).

32–36 :

1 Kings 19.15–18 anticipated a time when God's judgment would fall upon Israel because of Baal‐worship: Jehu would deal with those who escaped Hazael, and Elisha with those who escaped Jehu. This order implies that Hazael would turn out to be the greatest destroyer of the three. It is no surprise, therefore, to find that toward the end of the account of Jehu's reign, when his slaughter has ceased, we are first told of Hazael's aggression against Israel.

33 :

The Wadi Arnon was the southern limit of Israelite territory in Transjordan (Josh 12.2 ), all of which Hazael captured.

36 :

Jehu reigned ca.842–814 BCE.

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