We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Study Bible Study Bible supplemented with commentary from scholars of various religions.

Related Content

Commentary on Acts of the Apostles

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

2.1–47 : Pentecost.

1 :

Pentecost, fifty days following Passover, was a harvest festival which at this time celebrated the covenant (Lev. 23.15–21 ).

2–3 :

Wind and fire are meant to be understood symbolically, not literally.

4 :

It is not clear whether other tongues means languages (vv. 6, 8, 11 ) or ecstatic speaking (v. 13 ).

9–11 :

Examples are given illustrating the universality expressed in v. 5 .

14–36 : Peter's sermon.

14 :

Addressed is the same word as “utterance” (v. 4 ); the Spirit also empowers Peter's words.

17–21 :

Joel 2.28–32a .

22 :

Proof of Jesus’ divine mission by miracles is a regular part of Lukan theology; compare 10.38; Lk. 4.16–27 .

23 :

Plan of God is a regular motif of Lukan theology; compare Lk. 22.22 .

25–28 :

Ps. 16.8–11a .

30 :

The language reflects Ps. 132.11 .

32 :

Witnesses: to qualify as an apostle one had to have seen the risen Jesus; see 1 Cor. 9.1; 15.3–8 .

36 :

This verse says nothing about the time at which Jesus became Messiah; for Luke, Jesus was Messiah already during his lifetime, see 10.38; Lk. 4.18 .

37–41 : Response to the sermon.

38 :

Baptism and reception of the Holy Spirit are usually simultaneous; when they are not, it is due to special reasons; see 8.16–17; 10.47; 19.1–6 .

42–47 : Summary of early Christian life.

42 :

Break bread refers to common meals which included the Eucharist.

44–45 :

It was a usual practice in religious communities, including Qumran, to hold everything in common. Such common ownership (Gk., koina) was an expression of community (Gk., koinonia).

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice