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Shalmaneser V

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The Oxford Companion to the Bible What is This? Provides authoritative interpretive entries on Biblical people, places, beliefs, events, and secular influences.

    Shalmaneser V

    Shulmanu‐ashared, King of Assyria (727–722 BCE); otherwise known as Ululayu (“born in the month Ululu”). As son of his predecessor, Tiglath‐pileser III (745–727 BCE), Shalmaneser served as administrator in Calah, the Assyrian capital, while his father campaigned in foreign lands. After Tiglath‐pileser's death, Shalmaneser inherited the dual monarchy of Assyria and Babylonia and ruled for almost five years. Because Shalmaneser's reign was unexpectedly brief, court scribes had not drafted an official account of his campaigns and building achievements before his death; accordingly, his known royal inscriptions consist chiefly of eight Assyrian‐Aramaic bilingual texts on lion weights from Calah. Thus, the events of his reign must be reconstructed at present principally from later cuneiform inscriptions, the Assur Ostracon, brief references in 2 Kings, and Hellenistic texts such as Josephus's Antiquities. Shalmaneser was on the throne when Samaria fell to the Assyrians in 722 after a three‐year siege (Babylonian Chronicle, I.28; 2 Kings 17.5–6, 18.9–10); but the subsequent deportation of the Israelites probably took place in 720 under his successor, Sargon II (722–705 BCE).

    John A. Brinkman

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