A city founded by Herod Antipas (20 CE) as his new capital to replace Sepphoris, in honour of the emperor Tiberius on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee (also called the Sea of Tiberias, John 6: 1; 21: 1), on an important trade route. It had a good deal of independence and because it was the power base of the despised Herodian family, Jesus seems to have avoided it and also Sepphoris. It is mentioned only in passing by John (6: 23), and never in the synoptic gospels. Josephus was in command of forces which captured the city early in the Jewish War of 66–70 CE and he surrendered it to the Roman forces in 67. In the following centuries it had a strong Jewish cultural influence, and the Mishnah and the Palestinian Talmud emerged from Tiberias—even though, strictly, it was unclean according to Jewish Law, for it was built on the site of a cemetery.