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Displaying: abi - arc

  • Abiathar (A-Z entry)

    A priest in the army of King David ( 2 Sam. 20: 25 ), who later supported Adonijah's unsuccessful bid for the throne against ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Abijah (A-Z entry)

    The best-known of four OT characters of this name was the son and successor of Rehoboam . He was king of Judah ( 911 ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Abimelech (A-Z entry)

    Son of Gideon (or Jerubbaal) and a concubine from Shechem . Upon the death of Gideon, Abimelech got himself proclaimed king at Shechem ( ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Agag (A-Z entry)

    King of the Amalekites , whose life was spared by Saul after Israel's victory. For this act of mercy he was denounced by the ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • ῾Ajlun (A-Z entry)

    site located above Wadi Kafranja, one of three valleys between the two lakes which climb from the Jordan Valley up to the Transjordanian plateau ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Akkade (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Akkade (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    capital city, location unknown, of the Akkadian Empire ( c. 2290 – 2200 bce ), created and maintained by Sargon and his dynastic successors. ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Alexander III (“The Great”) (A-Z entry)

    Macedonian, born in 356 BCE . After the assassination of his father, Philip II , at Aegae in 336 , Alexander ascended to the ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Alexander the Great (A-Z entry)

    ( 356 – 323 bce ) King of Macedon from 336 who conquered the Persian Empire. Greek culture then permeated the Mediterranean region and ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Alexandrian Empire (Map) This result is a map

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Alexandrian Empire (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Alexandrian Empire (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    Under the hegemony of King Philip II of Macedonia and, later, his son Alexander III (the Great), the Greek city-states bound themselves to a ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • alliances (A-Z entry)

    In spite of the sense of a specially chosen people, foreign alliances were negotiated by Solomon ( 1 Kgs. 5: 1–12 ) and Ahab ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Amalek (A-Z entry)

    One of Israel's most unrelenting enemies, at least in the early periods, Amalek is first referred to in Abraham's day, in Genesis 14.7 , ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Amaziah (A-Z entry)

    King of Judah , 800 – 783 bce . He slaughtered 10,000 Edomites ( 2 Kgs. 14: 7 ) and his heart was so ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Ammon (A-Z entry)

    Ammon and the Ammonites make up one of the national groups east of the Jordan River mentioned by the Bible as enemies or subjects ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Ammon (A-Z entry)

    A tribal state located to the east of the Jordan River ( Map 1:Y‐Z4 ) that played a marginally significant role in the history ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Amphipolis (A-Z entry)

    A city and military post on the Egnatian Way. Paul passed through it on his journey to Thessalonica ( Acts 17: 1 ). The ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Amraphel (A-Z entry)

    The leader of an alliance of five kings who defeated a coalition of four rebels in the Dead Sea area ( Gen. 14 ). ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • archaeology (A-Z entry)

    Discoveries at a multitude of sites in the Middle East under a succession of brilliant archaeologists—British, American, German, French, and, since 1948 , Israeli—have ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

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