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Displaying: ana - beh

  • Anat (A-Z entry)

    a Canaanite goddess often depicted as a warrior.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • angels (A-Z entry)

    The Greek word aggelos means ‘messenger’ and as such angels are described as bearing messages from God to the patriarchs (e.g. Gen. 22: 11 ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Angels (A-Z entry)

    In Israel's early traditions, God was perceived as administering the cosmos with a retinue of divine assistants. The members of this divine council were ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • The Apocrypha (Chapters)

    Definition and History Apocrypha means ‘[books] hidden away’ and is the name given to those books found in the Old Testament of ancient Greek ...

    Source: The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

  • archangel (A-Z entry)

    From the Greek, meaning a chief angel; seven are named in 1 Enoch 20, cf. Tobit 12: 15 . In the two centuries bce ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Archangels (A-Z entry)

    From Greek archaggeloi , “chief angels” or “angels of high rank.” The plural form is not found in the Bible, but in Tobit 12.15 ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • aretalogy (A-Z entry)

    A narrative which is a recital of the qualities or virtues (Greek, aretai ) of a worker of miracles , such as Jesus and ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Artemis (A-Z entry)

    Diana of AV, NJB, the goddess worshipped in Ephesus in a great temple made of marble. Miniatures of her were sold by silversmiths ( ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Artemis of the Ephesians (A-Z entry)

    Artemis was the Greek goddess of the woods and hunting, as well as the patron of women in childbirth, identified with the Roman goddess ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Asherah (A-Z entry)

    The Canaanite mother goddess, associated with lions, serpents, and sacred trees. The word “asherah” in the Bible most often refers to a stylized wooden ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Ashtoreth (A-Z entry)

    A goddess of love and motherhood worshipped among the Canaanites ( Judg. 2: 13 ) and called Astarte among the Phoenicians , Aphrodite in ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Assumption of Moses (A-Z entry)

    a legend, the account of which is no longer in existence, that may be the origin of the allusion in Jude 9 to ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • assurance (A-Z entry)

    On the basis of Rom. 8: 16 some theologians of the Protestant tradition have held the doctrine that believers can be assured of their ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Astarte (A-Z entry)

    (AV: Ashtoreth , Ashtaroth ). The Greek form of Ashtart, one of the three great Canaanite goddesses. Astarte was primarily a goddess of fertility ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Astarte (A-Z entry)

    (as‐star′‐tee) (also Ishtar) the spouse of Baal (see); a symbol of fertility. The biblical writers denounced worship of “Astartes” (Judg 2.13), which translates ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Atrahasis (A-Z entry)

    hero of the Mesopotamian epic of Atrahasis, who survives the god Enlil's efforts to destroy humankind by, among other means, a flood (with ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Azazel (A-Z entry)

    Appears only in the Day of Atonement ritual in Leviticus 16 . Two goats were designated by lot ( 16.8 ), one for the ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Baal (A-Z entry)

    A common Semitic word meaning “owner, lord, husband.” As “lord” it is applied to various Canaanite gods, such as the Baal of Peor ( ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Baal‐zebub (A-Z entry)

    The Phoenician god at Ekron consulted by King Ahaziah ( 2 Kings 1.2–18 ). The name in Hebrew means “Lord of Flies,” but no ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Behemoth (A-Z entry)

    A mythical beast described in Job 40.15–24 as the first of God's creations, an animal of enormous strength that inhabits the river valleys. Although ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

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