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Displaying: act - eph

  • The Acts of Peter (Chapters)

    The figure of Peter gave rise to much apocryphal literature. The Acts and Passion of Peter appear in various forms and in various languages. ...

    Source: The Apocryphal New Testament

  • Acts of the Apostles (A-Z entry)

    The fifth book of the New Testament in the common arrangement, Acts records certain phases of the progress of Christianity for a period of ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • adoptionism (A-Z entry)

    A theory about the Person of Christ associated with the heretic Nestorius ( d. 451 ce ) that Jesus was a man gifted with ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Apostle (A-Z entry)

    The Greek word apostolos (“someone who has been sent”) is seldom used in classical Greek, but it occurs eighty times in the New Testament, ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • captivity epistles (A-Z entry)

    Traditionally the letters to the Philippians, Colossians, Philemon, and Ephesians; they are grouped together because they all mention Paul's current imprisonment . But where ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • catechetical material (A-Z entry)

    The Greek word catechesis means ‘an echo’, and in NT studies it denotes sections of the epistles which are believed to represent oral instruction ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • catholic epistles (A-Z entry)

    A term used for those NT epistles that are not addressed to particular Churches or individuals: James, 1 and 2 Peter, 1 and 2 ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Catholic Letters (A-Z entry)

    “General” (Grk. katholikos ) epistles written to early Christianity at large, rather than to specific congregations (like the letters of Paul and Rev. 2–3 ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Clement, epistles of (A-Z entry)

    Writings from the age immediately after the NT period. The first epistle was addressed to Corinth and is of interest in showing that some ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Colossians, Paul’s letter to the (A-Z entry)

    In the NT, the seventh letter of Paul. Religious teachers had come into the Lycus valley and were disturbing the tranquillity of the Church ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Colossians, The Letter of Paul to the (A-Z entry)

    Outline. I. Introductory greeting ( 1.1–2 ) II. Thanksgiving: Faith‐love‐hope and the gospel ( 1.3–8 ) III. Praying for knowledge and godly conduct ( ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Corinth. (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

  • 1 Corinthians (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    The letter known as 1 Corinthians was one of several letters that the apostle Paul dispatched to house churches in Corinth, the capital of ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

  • 2 Corinthians (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    In 2 Corinthians 1:1 Paul introduces himself to the congregations of Corinth and of the Roman province of Achaia as “an apostle of Christ ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

  • Corinthians, Paul’s letters to the (A-Z entry)

    Placed in the NT immediately after Paul’s letter to the Romans. One commentator described the problems surrounding the two extant letters sent by Paul ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Corinthians, The Letters of Paul to the (A-Z entry)

    Though edited as two separate letters, the canonical letters of 1 and 2 Corinthians most likely consist of several shorter letters or notes written ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Deacon (A-Z entry)

    The Greek noun diakonos underlying the English word “deacon” has in general usage the meaning of “servant,” especially in the sense of one who ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Deity in the Biblical Communities and among their Neighbors (Chapters)

    The Apostle Paul, offering instructions to the Corinthians on the subject of eating consecrated meat derived from pagan sacrifices, quoted those to whom he ...

    Source: The Oxford Study Bible

  • Epaphras (A-Z entry)

    A companion of Paul during his imprisonment, and evidently a leading member of the Church at Colossae ( Col. 4: 12 ; Philem. 23 ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Ephesians, Paul’s letter to the (A-Z entry)

    In the NT, the fifth of the letters of Paul. But it is more of a doctrinal treatise, dressed up as a letter by ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

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