We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Refine List
All

Browse All

Previous
Next

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Displaying: abo - anc

  • abomination (A-Z entry)

    Frequently in AV, and sometimes in NRSV, it describes an action or article incompatible with the true religion of Israel, as in Lev. 7: ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Abu Simbel (A-Z entry)

    colossal temple complex located in the northern Sudan about 200 km (186 mi.) up the Nile from Aswan (22°21′ N, 31°38′ E). Built in ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Abydos (A-Z entry)

    one of ancient Egypt's most sacred sites, located in the eighth Upper Egyptian nome, or province (26°11′ N, 31°55′ E). Archaeological survey indicates that ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Active Intellect (A-Z entry)

    in mystical thought, the repository of the intelligible forms that govern the sublunar world.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Adonai (A-Z entry)

    (Heb “my Lord”) a divine title and the word generally substituted for the Tetragrammaton , Yhvh, when the Bible is read aloud.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Ahimelech (A-Z entry)

    Priest at Nob ( 1 Sam. 21: 1–6 ). During his flight from Saul , David , desperate for food, was given the bread ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Ahiram Inscription (A-Z entry)

    The sarcophagus of Ahiram found in Byblos, in Lebanon, by French archaeologists In 1923 is one of the most important works of art from ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • ʿaliyah (A-Z entry)

    (Heb “ascent”) pilgrimage or emigration to the land of Israel; being given the honor of “ascending” to read the Torah in synagogue worship.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • aloes (A-Z entry)

    A fragrant spice (not a bitter plant) used as perfume ( Ps. 45: 8 and S. of S. 4: 14 ) and on the ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • altar (A-Z entry)

    In the OT, a place of sacrifice near which animals were slaughtered and on which oblations of corn, wine, and incense were burnt and ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • ʿAmidah (A-Z entry)

    (Heb “standing”) the main prayer in Jewish worship. Also called the Shemonah ʿ Esrei (eighteen [blessings]), although on regular weekdays (not Shabbat or ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Amman Airport Temple (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Amman Airport Temple (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    located at the former Amman Civil Airport in Markeh, Jordan, a northern suburb of Amman. The site lies immediately east of the apron runway, ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Amos (Chapters)

    Amos is the earliest of the prophets who have books in their names. In fact, his oracles were transmitted orally and were only collected ...

    Source: The Catholic Study Bible

  • Amulets (A-Z entry)

    The Latin term amuletum (“an object used as a charm to avert evil”) was possibly derived from the Arabic word hamilet (something “carried, worn”) ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • ancestor worship (A-Z entry)

    The real or supposed ancestors of the Hebrews were venerated and were felt to be so close that their descendants even continued to suffer ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Anchors (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Anchors (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Anchors (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Anchors (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    In antiquity, those who sailed utilized stones as the earliest anchoring devices. As anchors found on the seabed assume the passing of a ship, ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Previous
Next
Oxford University Press

© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice