We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Refine List
All

Browse All

Previous
Next

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Displaying: abb - dia

  • Abba (A-Z entry)

    The word for “my father” or “the father.” This Aramaic word appears three times in the New Testament, followed by a translation into Greek: ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Abel, Félix-Marie (A-Z entry)

    ( 1878 – 1953 ), professor of history and geography at the École Biblique et Archéologique Française in Jerusalem from 1905 to 1953 . ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Abyss (A-Z entry)

    The abyss, or bottomless depth, appears in biblical tradition in several related senses. In the Hebrew Bible, tĕhôm (NRSV: “the deep”) usually refers to ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • aggadah (A-Z entry)

    (or “haggadah,”possibly from Heb huggad ,“things said” or “what is told”) the nonlegal portions of the Talmud and Midrash (see halakhah ). Aggadah ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Aḥad HaʿAm (A-Z entry)

    (Heb “one of the people” or “the people are one”) pen‐name of Asher Ginzberg (1856–1927), Zionist writer.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Apocalyptic Literature (A-Z entry)

    The words “apocalyptic” and “apocalypse” (from a Greek root meaning “to uncover,” “to reveal”) are terms that came to be used from the second ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • apologia (A-Z entry)

    Greek, “explanation.” A defense of one's actions or beliefs, usually given in a formal speech or written document.

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Aqedah (A-Z entry)

    The Hebrew word for “binding,” and the common designation for Genesis 22.1–19 , in which God tests Abraham by commanding that he sacrifice his ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Assumption of Moses (A-Z entry)

    a legend, the account of which is no longer in existence, that may be the origin of the allusion in Jude 9 to ...

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • The Bible in Israeli Life* (Chapters)

    The Bible, once at the center of the cultural scene in Israel, has become marginalized; its magic has faded. A new Israeli generation no ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • The Bible in Literature (Chapters)

    The books of the Bible, from Genesis to Revelation, are undoubtedly the single greatest influence on the development of English literature, and the reasons ...

    Source: The Oxford Illustrated History of the Bible

  • The Bible in the Dead Sea Scrolls (Chapters)

    Until the discovery in the Judean Desert, near the Dead Sea, of more than 200 scrolls containing various parts of the Bible, historical and ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • The Bible in the Jewish Mystical Tradition (Chapters)

    Background to the Jewish Mystical Tradition Early Sources The mystical tradition in Judaism is a multifaceted phenomenon whose early roots reach back to the ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • The Bible in the Jewish Philosophical Tradition (Chapters)

    Understanding what the Bible says and means has been the central concern of the Jewish philosophical tradition. Jewish philosophers have assumed that the biblical ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • The Bible in the Liturgy (Chapters)

    For much of Judaism's history, one of its central means of liturgical expression has been the traditional rabbinic prayerbook or Siddur. The Siddur (understood ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • bicolon (A-Z entry)

    unit of Heb poetry composed of two cola ,or lines (sometimes called a dístich ).

    Source: Oxford Biblical Studies Online

  • Catholic Interpretation of the Bible (Chapters)

    The Early Church (ca. ad 100–500) The early Catholic interpretation of the Bible, like Christianity itself, did not emerge or develop in a religious, ...

    Source: The Catholic Study Bible

  • Classical Rabbinic Interpretation (Chapters)

    By the 1st century ce , Jewish interpretation was beginning a long process of standardization and development. The Rabbis who carried out this program ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • The Development of the Masoretic Bible (Chapters)

    The transmission of the Bible may be divided into four broad periods: (1) the era of Qumran (3rd century bce –1st century ce ); ...

    Source: The Jewish Study Bible

  • Diaspora and Rabbinic Judaism (Chapters)

    The study of the history, literature, and religious beliefs and practices of ancient Jews in the Land of Israel and the Diaspora provides the ...

    Source: The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Studies

Previous
Next
Oxford University Press

© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice