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Displaying: naa - naḥ

  • Naaman (A-Z entry)

    An army officer under Benhadad of Syria who had contracted leprosy and heard from an Israelite slave‐girl about the miraculous powers of the prophet ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Nabataean Arabia (A-Z entry)

    The Nabataean kingdom in Arabia of the Hellenistic–Roman era stretched from the Ḥaurān in southern Syria to the northern Hijaz in the Arabian Peninsula. ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Archaeology

  • Nabataeans (A-Z entry)

    Occupants of territory E. and SW of the Dead Sea , who spoke a form of Aramaic . They were important in the inter‐testamental ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Nabatean (A-Z entry)

    The form of Middle Aramaic spoken by Nabatean nomads (Greek Nabataioi ). Their kingdom was called Nbṭw (Aramaic), Nabatene (Greek), or Nabataea (Latin). They ...

    Source: Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls

  • Nabatean Inscriptions (A-Z entry)

    The Nabateans are of Arab descent, as their personal names, certain Arabic words incorporated in their vocabulary, and a recently discovered inscription found in ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nabateans (A-Z entry)

    During the late Hellenistic and Early Roman imperial era, an Arab kingdom centered at Petra in Edomite Transjordan established itself as one of the ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nabateans (A-Z entry)

    Origins and Growth. The consensus of modern scholarship no longer relates the Nabateans to the biblical Nebaioth , the firstborn son of Ishmael ( ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Nablus (A-Z entry)

    See Shechem .

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nabonidus, Prayer of (A-Z entry)

    See Court Tales .

    Source: Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls

  • Naboth (A-Z entry)

    Owner of a vineyard which King Ahab wished to buy because it adjoined the royal property; but when Naboth refused to sell, Queen Jezebel ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Nabratein (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nabratein (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nabratein (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    ( Ar., “two hills; also known as Kefar Neburaya ), site located 4 km (2.5 mi.) north-northeast of Safed in Upper Galilee (33°2′ N, ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nag Hammadi (Image) This result contains an image

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nag Hammadi (A-Z entry)

    A modern town in upper Egypt . It is the nearest town to Chenoboskion , where texts relevant to the early Christian Church were ...

    Source: A Dictionary of the Bible

  • Nag Hammadi (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    city in southern Egypt near discovery site of important Coptic Gnostic texts (26°03′ N, 32°15′ E). The name Nag Hammadi has become popular in ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

  • Nag Hammadi Library (A-Z entry)

    Before the publication of the Berlin Codex 8502, resources for the study of gnosticism were almost entirely limited to the refutations of the early ...

    Source: The Oxford Companion to the Bible

  • Nag Hammadi Library (A-Z entry) This result contains an image

    The collection of texts referred to as the Nag Hammadi library consists of forty-six texts (plus fragments and duplicates) copied onto the papyrus pages ...

    Source: The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Books of the Bible

  • The Nag Hammadi Texts (Chapters)

    In 1945, at Nag Hammadi some 500 km (300 mi) south of Cairo, Egyptian peasants unearthed a large jar containing thirteen codices. Most of ...

    Source: The New Oxford Annotated Bible; from chapter The Interpretation of the Bible

  • Naḥal _____ (A-Z entry)

    See under latter part of name .

    Source: Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls

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