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Citation for New Testament Uses of The Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books

Citation styles are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed., and the MLA Style Manual, 2nd Ed..

MLA

"New Testament Uses of The Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books." In The New Oxford Annotated Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online. Nov 18, 2019. <http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195288803/obso-9780195288803-div1-956>.

Chicago

"New Testament Uses of The Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books." In The New Oxford Annotated Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online, http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195288803/obso-9780195288803-div1-956 (accessed Nov 18, 2019).

New Testament Uses of The Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical Books

None of the books of the New Testament quote directly from any Apocryphal book, in contrast to the frequent quotation of the thirty‐nine books in the Hebrew Bible. Several New Testament writers, however, do allude to one or more apocryphal books. For example, what seem to be literary echoes from the Wisdom of Solomon are present in Paul's Letter to the Romans (compare Rom 1.20–29 with Wis 13.5,8; 14.24, 27; and Rom 9.20–23 with Wis 12.12,20; 15.7 ) and in his correspondence with the Corinthians (compare 2 Cor 5.1,4 with Wis 9.15 ). The short Letter of James, a typical bit of “wisdom literature” in the New Testament, contains allusions not only to the book of Proverbs in the Hebrew Bible but to gnomic sayings in Sirach as well (compare Jas 1.19 with Sir 5.11; and Jas 1.13 with Sir 15.11–12 ).

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