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Citation for Introduction

Citation styles are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed., and the MLA Style Manual, 2nd Ed..

MLA

Suggs, M. Jack , Katharine Doob Sakenfeld and James R. Mueller. "Obadiah." In The Oxford Study Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online. Oct 22, 2020. <http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195290004/obso-9780195290004-chapterFrontMatter-31>.

Chicago

Suggs, M. Jack , Katharine Doob Sakenfeld and James R. Mueller. "Obadiah." In The Oxford Study Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online, http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195290004/obso-9780195290004-chapterFrontMatter-31 (accessed Oct 22, 2020).

Obadiah - Introduction

Nothing is known about this Obadiah. The similarities between vv. 1–9 and Jer. 49.7–22 suggest a common time of origin for both passages, and possibly a common prophetic circle.

The book consists of short poems of diverse origin, unified by the prediction that Israel's and Edom's national situations will be reversed. In the tradition (Gen. 25.24–26 ), Edom (Esau) was the twin brother of Israel (Jacob); according to Obadiah, Edom has not been his brother's keeper (v. 10 ), and now the LORD will punish Edom.

This latter theme suggests that the book originated shortly after the Babylonian sack of Jerusalem in 587 B.C.E., in which the Edomites apparently participated.

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