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Citation for Introduction

Citation styles are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed., and the MLA Style Manual, 2nd Ed..

MLA

Suggs, M. Jack , Katharine Doob Sakenfeld and James R. Mueller. "The Gospel According to Mark." In The Oxford Study Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online. Oct 21, 2020. <http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195290004/obso-9780195290004-chapterFrontMatter-56>.

Chicago

Suggs, M. Jack , Katharine Doob Sakenfeld and James R. Mueller. "The Gospel According to Mark." In The Oxford Study Bible. Oxford Biblical Studies Online, http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780195290004/obso-9780195290004-chapterFrontMatter-56 (accessed Oct 21, 2020).

The Gospel According to Mark - Introduction

Probably the oldest of the Gospels, Mark is a collection of traditions about Jesus brought together around 70 C.E. The import of the term “collection” should not mislead one to suppose that the material is presented haphazardly. On the contrary, the author depicts Jesus' early ministry as centered in Galilee, where he proclaims the imminence of the rule and salvation of God (the kingdom) and performs wonders; at its climax comes Peter's confession of faith and the first announcement of the passion ( 8.27–33 ). From that crucial point, the story moves relentlessly toward the cross and resurrection (chs. 14–16 ). Within this general framework, other “turning points” may also be found: e.g. 1.14; 3.6; 10.1 .

Moreover, certain motifs can be identified as of special concern to the evangelist. Perhaps the most important of these, at least in the Galilean section, is the victory over demonic forces to be seen in Jesus' healing activity. While the power which achieves that victory is exercised publicly, another Markan idea has to do with maintaining secrecy with respect to Jesus' identity (e.g. 1.34 n. ). And the reader discovers a remarkable obtuseness even among the disciples (e.g. 8.17; 9.32 ) as another theme.

The book's purpose is succinctly expressed: to proclaim the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God ( 1.1; 15.39 ).

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